Primer on Furnace Short-Cycling Causes, Part 2

In part one of this two-part blog series, we went over some of the primary causes associated with furnace short-cycling. This process, where the furnace turns itself on and off far too frequently, can lead to everything from poor heating cycles to major strain on the furnace and other HVAC components.

At My Buddy the Plumber, we’re here to help with a variety of furnace repair and replacement services as needed, including if your furnace is short-cycling and needs attention to correct the problem. Here are a few other potential precursors to short-cycling, including a couple that actually go all the way back to when your furnace or HVAC system was set up to begin with.

primer furnace short-cycling causes

Thermostat Location

One such area is the location of the thermostat itself, which might be more important than you’d think in this area. The thermostat location is the point at which temperature for the home or area is determined, setting the baseline for how much heat the furnace needs to provide – so if the thermostat area is too warm or too cold compared to the rest of the home, it could lead to uneven heating and other concerns.

And in cases where the area is too hot, short-cycling is a common result. If the thermostat is right above a heating grate, for instance, or located near the closet where the furnace itself is situated, it will think the home is heated before this is truly the case. This will cause it to turn off too early. In such cases, many of which involve self-installation of the thermostat, call our HVAC technicians about changing the location to a more effective area.

Blockage Issues

We talked a lot about overheating furnaces as a cause of short-cycling in part one, and one of the potential lead-ups to this is a blockage of some kind. In some cases, this blockage is taking place in the heating grates or ducts, which may have dust buildups or other specific blockages that stop air from making its way through at the proper rate, leading to not enough warming before the furnace turns off again.

In other cases, the blockage is in the exhaust vent. This is a problem not only due to short-cycling risks, but also because this risks allowing carbon monoxide in, a potentially harmful chemical.

Furnace Size

Finally, another common reason for short-cycling is a furnace that is too large for the home to begin with. Bigger is not always necessarily better here, and certain furnaces may have too much power for your space – this will cause them to shut down too early in many cases, or to badly over-heat the home in others. In these situations, it’s usually best to replace the unit.

For more on furnace short-cycling and how to watch for its causes, or to learn about any of our HVAC or plumbing services, speak to the staff at My Buddy the Plumber today.